The six thinking hats represent the six ways of planning thinking processes, making decisions, and talking about the best UX writing posts.

The best UX writing posts, the six thinking hats

What is UX writing? What does a UX writer do?

A hiring manager from an international company based in Barcelona asked me these two questions a few months ago. And I admit that I didn’t know the correct answers at the time.

So I decided to sign up for a UX writing course, adopt some necessary pieces of knowledge, and make a step towards the UX writer profession.

Thanks to the course, I learned the pillars of UX writing. However, that’s not all I know nowadays about the content that enhances user experience.

Since I intended to keep learning along the way, I found some UX writing blogs which turned out to be very helpful.

The blogs were both Spanish and English.

Therefore, I dedicate this post to the best UX writing contents I’ve read during the recent period. And to make the post more appealing, I’ll use the six thinking hats method.

Okay, I’m about to put on the blue hat and start with the introduction. Will you join me?

The 30 best UX writing posts: the blue hat

The six thinking hats is a method used in group decision-making discussions.

The idea behind the method is to discover the different facets of REALITY, make visible the ASPECTS that may remain hidden, and facilitate the final decision-making PROCESS.

The six thinking hats, Wikipedia

However, in this post, I’ll use the same method, but for a different purpose.

My goal is to discover the different facets of UX WRITING, make visible the BENEFITS that may remain hidden, and facilitate the DECISION if hire or not a UX writer.

Now that you know what my goal is, let’s see what each of the six UX writing hats in this text represents:

  • The blue hat organises the rest, puts the order, and provide us with a so-called big picture. I’m wearing it right now.
  • The white hat represents the posts where it’s explained what UX writing is (facts and information).
  • The red hat – the posts where UX writing is linked to specific values, feelings, and intuition (feelings and emotions)
  • The black hat – the posts that warn us of the “dangers” related to UX writing (critical judgement)
  • The yellow hat – the posts where we can discover the benefits of UX writing (positive approach)
  • The green hat – the posts that focus on UX writing and creativity (new ideas)

What is UX writing: the white hat

The three posts in English that answer the question about what UX writing is:

The three posts in Spanish that answer the question about what UX writing is:

The UX writing characteristics: the red hat

The three posts in English that explain the characteristics of UX writing:

The three posts in Spanish that explain the characteristics of UX writing:

The negative aspects: the black hat

The three texts in English that treat issues, failures, and harmful practices related to UX writing:

  • No Good, Very Bad UX Writing Mistakes – The author of this text considers that a wrong interaction with a user represents a missed opportunity. Therefore, he warns us of ten ways to fail in communication with the users.
  • Thank you, lorem ipsum – Despite being perceived as a glitch, the lorem ipsum text encourages UX writers creativity.
  • Stop Rewriting My UX Copy – Many UX writers face the following problem: clients change their texts, instead of providing feedback that would help them understand the flaws. The author of this post gives us some guidelines to solve this problem.

The benefits: the yellow hat

The three texts in English that reveal the benefits of UX writing:

The three texts in Spanish that reveal the benefits of UX writing:

Creativity and UX writing: the green hat

The three texts in English that speak of creativity, imagination, and UX writing:

The three texts in Spanish that speak of creativity, imagination, and UX writing:

The best UX writing posts

Although mathematics isn’t my strong point, I’m aware that three texts are missing to complete the list of thirty best UX writing texts. Those are the texts in Spanish that explain issues, failures, and harmful practices related to UX writing.

However, I couldn’t find those three texts.

Maybe I wasn’t searching correctly. Or perhaps UX writing in Spanish doesn’t fail?

Either way, I’ll keep that in mind for one of my next blog posts.

Until then, I invite you to put one of the six thinking hats on and to make a comment. Feel free to be objective or creative, positive or negative.

The color of the hat doesn’t matter. Your opinion does.

A Writing-Friendly question: Do you know some example of UX writing failure or harmful practice?

Stasa Durdic

I'm a content writer, copywriter, and UX writer. Serbian by birth, in Barcelona by occasion, writer by decision. I'm in love with the yellow colour, the art of storytelling, and the following phrase from Don Draper (Mad Men): "The client loves to pay the media, and the CREATIVE loves the PENCILS."

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Categories: UX writing

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